A Calendar of the Letters of Willa Cather

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Results 11-20:

To Pauline Goldmark,  n.d. [Mar. 6, 1912?] UVa 

Sorry she has had bad news. Mr. McClure turned up unexpectedly last week. Leaving for Pittsburgh tomorrow. Elsie Sergeant saved her sanity while she [Cather] was in Boston.   Willa Sibert Cather   [Stout #215]


To Elizabeth Shepley Sergeant,  Tuesday [pm. Apr. 30, 1914] PM 

Thanks for the cheery letter. Is free of bandages now. Went to Atlantic City for a few days and got sidetracked from her [Cather's] story, but is back on it now. Writing a lot about the mechanics and politics of opera. Is getting acquainted with the Hoyts. Wishes events in Mexico would settle down so she could go see the cities there. Going to Pittsburgh soon.   W.   [Stout #280]


To Ferris Greenslet,  Saturday [prob. July 24, 1915] , from PittsburghHarvard 

For three days has been on the verge of sailing for Bergen, then to Germany to interview German leaders. Since S. S. McClure was going, there had to be someone else, so Isabelle was going. All off when Judge McClung decided he didn't want her to take the risk. Will get back onto the page proofs. It was a more appealing project financially than the novel will be. Would have needed to be tactful in order to be accurate without being or at least seeming pro-German.   Willa Cather   [Stout #315]


To Elizabeth Shepley SergeantJuly 28, [1915], from PittsburghPM 

Was about to sail for Germany when Judge McClung decided Isabelle must not go. Will start for Durango August 6. Proofs are finished. Even the page proofs needed a lot of correction. Loves North of Boston [Frost], so bare and strong. Knowing real poetry is being written enables her to tolerate even the likes of Witter Bynner.   W. S. C.   [Stout #317]


To Elizabeth Shepley SergeantDec. 7, [1915], from PittsburghPM 

Judge McClung died three weeks ago. Wishes she had reviewed the book. Misses Thea's company. Had feared Fremstad might be angry about the book, but she liked it exceedingly.    W.   [Stout #340]


To Dorothy Canfield FisherMar. 15, [1916?]UVt 

The Song of the Lark was fun to write, but shows carelessness. Cut out several chapters set in Germany to keep it focused on the Moonstone perspective. They would have spoiled the unity. A few negative reviewers have wished it were a tragedy rather than a success story. The title is a weakness, it's true. Hasn't been up to starting a new book this winter, with Judge McClung's death, the closing of the house, and prospect of Isabelle's marriage [April 3, 1916]. Doesn't get along well with Jan Hambourg. Loss of Isabelle is a severe one. Also, Annie Fields died last winter. So much misery in the world in general, with the war. Wishes they could have a long talk.   Willa   [Stout #351]


To Ferris GreensletAug. 22, [1916], from Red Cloud, Nebr.Harvard 

Has been in the Wind River Mountains in Wyoming. Has he seen Alice Meynell's review in the Manchester Guardian? Will have another book ready by the end of the year, probable title "The Blue Mesa." The book on the Southwest to come after that. Is shutting last year behind her. Glad to receive his check.   W. S. C.   [Stout #365]


To Zoë AkinsMay 4, [1918?]Huntington 

Interested in her new efforts in play production. Looking forward to seeing her piece [probably "Did It Really Happen?"] in Smart Set. What is she going to do with the Spoon River poet in her anthology? [The "anthology" was a series by Akins published from Feb. 19 to Aug. 13, 1915, in Reedy's Mirror, St. Louis. The series was to have been published in book form but was not until 1994, under the title In the Shadow of Parnassus: A Critical Anthology of Contemporary American Poetry, edited by Catherine Parke.] He is beneath comment. P.S.: Sending some poems not in April Twilights. Novel finished and being set in type.  W. S. C.   [Stout #415]


To Duncan M. VinsonhalerOct. 20, 1922, from New YorkUVa 

Appreciates his writing about the book. Can't remember ever wanting so much to get a character across as this one. Will hope to see him if she is in Omaha.   Willa Cather   [Stout #631]


To Ned AbbottOct. 25, [1922?], from New YorkWCPM 

If he weren't a friend from school, would refuse his request for biographical information. Suggests he talk with Mrs. Alice E. D. Goudy in Auburn, Nebraska, who was her high school teacher and knew her all through college. P.S.: Very proud of Newbranch's editorial. Prefers he not mention the McClure autobiography.  Willa Cather   [Stout #636]


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