A Calendar of the Letters of Willa Cather

86 letters found

Search parameters

next

Results 1-10:

To Louise PoundOct. 13, 1897 from PittsburghDuke 

Not fair to accuse her of keeping her address a secret. Had not expected to be daytime telegraph editor when she accepted the Leader job, but when it became available applied and got it, despite youth and sex. Work is like running a race, but hours are short. Hard to write distinctive headlines for a dozen suicides at a time. Has received A Portrait of a Lady [ James ]. Mr. Farrar has come to call, so must break off.    Willa Cather   [Stout #46]


To Sarah Orne JewettDec. 19, [1908], from New York ; Harvard 

Has read her letter many times. These past few years has felt confused, tired, drained of energy by the job and has felt cut off from her self. Mr. McClure wants her to become another Ida Tarbell; he doesn't believe she will ever be much of a writer of fiction. Feels as much a beginner in her writing as she ever did, as if she hadn't learned at all. Doesn't even have the feeling of learning about other things, as when she was a teacher. Hectic pace is giving her a bad temperament. Glad to have her salary; needs to help out the family now and then; but could quit now and have enough in the bank to live on for three or four years. Has reread "Martha's Lady," such a beautiful story. Will hope to get up to Boston after Christmas.   Willa   [Stout #145]


To Glendinning Keeble,  Monday [prob. July 19, 1915] , from New YorkCMU 

Appreciates his returning proofs quickly; couldn't finish until she got his help. Isabelle will be leaving for Pittsburgh in a few days and she will follow. In the meantime she and all of New York interested in a group of eight morris dancers staying across the street from her who are causing trouble for their stage manager due to having lost all their gear en route.   [Stout #313]


To Ferris GreensletSept. 13, [1915], from Red Cloud, Nebr.Harvard 

Good work on the publicity booklet and poster. Thanks for the advance copy. Likes the cover, jacket, and type. Has excellent photos of Mesa Verde provided by the Denver and Rio Grande Railroad, also of Taos and the pueblos near Santa Fe. Would he still like to have a book about the Southwest? Might be able to travel for free on Santa Fe next summer to gather additional material. Unfortunately, has gained six pounds while climbing and riding. Edith lost weight.   W. S. C.   [Stout #322]


To Mrs. George P. Cather [Aunt Franc]Dec. 25, 1915, from PittsburghUNL-Ray 

Is sending her love on this special day. Since Isabelle McClung has lost her father as well as her mother and this house (which has been almost a home to her [Cather] for fifteen years) is to be sold, it is her last Christmas there. May never feel so secure in any other house. Even her apartment in New York, pleasant as it is, is not a home in the way this was. Has been spending some time with Jack during the school vacation. New book enjoying good sales as well as favorable reviews. Is eager to get to work on a new one.   Willa    [Stout #343]


To Zoë AkinsApr. 20, [1922?], from Galen Hall, Wernersville, Pa.Huntington 

Doctor sent her to this sanitorium after she left the hospital. Luxurious surroundings but terrible food. Lost a lot of weight in the hospital; couldn't swallow anything solid for over a week. Working on her proofs.   Willa   [Stout #586]


To Dorothy Canfield Fisher,  Friday [April 7, 1922] UVt 

Pleased she has offered to review the book. Will want it to be well placed for impact. The fact that Claude was modeled on her cousin is not for general information. Glad to have managed to convey the feeling of the uncultivated person who wants culture. A kind of revenge for the way Dorothy made her feel in France, though a revenge without anger attached. Was with her cousin in Nebraska at the start of the war and felt a strong tie. Feels drained by the effort of writing the book and the closeness to Claude's mind, now lost to her since it is finished. An ordeal but a joyful one.   Willa   [Stout #590]


To Dorothy Canfield Fisher,  Tuesday [March 21, 1922] UVt 

Thanks for her sympathetic reading of the novel and especially of Claude himself. Book is shaped by his sense of things. New book now starting on is more outward. Has cut out big chunks of it [ One of Ours ] and probably should cut out the chapter with the shell exploding under him.   Willa   [Stout #596]


To Wilbur CrossOct. 11, 1922, from New YorkBeinecke 

People seem to have strong feelings about One of Ours, pro or con. Has been thinking he might like a memoir about Mrs. James T. Fields [for Yale Review], but through a misunderstanding Henry Seidel Canby is expecting such a piece from her [for Literary Review, New York Evening Post]. No longer interested in doing the article she discussed with Miss McAfee a year ago. Wants to keep working on a new novelette [ A Lost Lady ].   Willa Sibert Cather   [Stout #626]


To E. H. AndersonNov. 24, 1922NYPL 

Hurrying to leave for Nebraska but will answer briefly. Georgine Milmine, now Mrs. Benjamin Wells, of Aubrey, N.Y., gathered material on Mrs. Eddy. McClure bought the material, subsequently lost (along with a first edition of Science and Health) when the magazine was sold. Milmine couldn't do the writing, and after sampling short segments of it done by several other people he chose her [Cather]. This was shortly after she came to New York. Carefully checked the material and believes it is all accurate except the first chapter, written by Burton Hendrick, now with Doubleday. His resentment at being removed from the project may be part of the reason Doubleday does not bring it back into print. Please keep confidential.   Willa Cather   [Stout #649]


next