A Calendar of the Letters of Willa Cather

8 letters found

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To Ferris Greenslet,  Tuesday [prob. Apr. 6, 1915] , from New YorkHarvard 

Will change "billiards" to "pool" and refrain from making Dr. Archie governor. Sorry he objects to the diminishing scale of the book, but that was her plan, to emphasize Thea's youth. Hopes he can come see her this weekend. Can't phone; has no telephone.   Willa Cather   [Stout #296]


To Glendinning Keeble,  n.d. [prob. between May 15, 1915, and July 19, 1915] CMU 

Is offering a revision of the character of Jessie Darcey [singer Thea Kronborg accompanies in The Song of the Lark] and will be glad to revise more. Thea has control over her own fortune; was a liar and was lied to. She expected to marry Fred, despite the fact that her Methodist childhood would not have led her to expect it. She ended up punishing Fred for what she did herself. Won't make all this entirely clear, because doesn't want character of Thea to alienate readers. Isabelle is going away for a few days to rest.   [Stout #305]


To Ferris GreensletJune 30, [1915], from New YorkHarvard 

Likes the jacket, but the copy is wrong—Moonstone, Colorado, not Arizona. Also, Thea and Fred go to Mexico, not New Mexico. Wishes it could say something about her artistic growth in the cliff dweller ruins. Actually, not so very happy with the cover. Couldn't it be more like British edition of Pioneers? Henry James seems patronizing in his essay on the Fieldses.   Willa Cather   [Stout #311]


To Elizabeth Shepley SergeantDec. 7, [1915], from PittsburghPM 

Judge McClung died three weeks ago. Wishes she had reviewed the book. Misses Thea's company. Had feared Fremstad might be angry about the book, but she liked it exceedingly.    W.   [Stout #340]


To Dorothy Canfield FisherSept. 2, [1916]UVt 

Just reached Red Cloud after a summer in New Mexico and Wyoming. Enjoyed Roscoe and his family, especially the twins. Made a talk about The Bent Twig [Canfield Fisher's novel, 1915] to a bridge club. Interesting that they both used the same kind of treatment for such different material. Sympathizes with the character who fled moral restrictions. The mother reminds her of a stalwart woman who came to visit Fremstad when she was in Maine—such wisdom. They have different groups of readers in Lincoln. Dorothy's think Cather immoral, and her own think Dorothy boring. All of Dorothy's readers want to believe Thea didn't live with Fred out of wedlock.   Willa   [Stout #366]


To Ferris GreensletDec. 16, [1916], from New YorkHarvard 

People she knows from Sweden and Norway have indicated possible interest there in translations of O Pioneers! and The Song of the Lark. Could he take it up with publishers, perhaps enclosing a copy of Edward Garnett's article in last February's Atlantic? Is enclosing a list of the best people to write. He can get their attention by mentioning that reviewers have thought Thea Kronborg was modeled after Olive Fremstad. Please send three dozen copies of the advertising booklet for her to send to people who inquire. Finishing some short stories for Reynolds to place, but will start on the next book soon. Hopes he can come to New York to discuss the Scandinavian possibilities. Will have a phone in soon and send him the number. Might he be there next Thursday [Dec. 21] for dinner with the Hambourgs, S. S. McClure, and Harry Dwight? McClure will tell everyone about the war.   Willa S. C.   [Stout #375]


To Ferris GreensletFeb. 15, [1932], from Grosvenor Hotel, New YorkHarvard 

Please avoid adding credence to the rumor that she modeled Thea Kronborg on Olive Fremstad. Story does not resemble her life at all. Simply remain silent on the matter. Please send report of royalties paid in 1931.   Willa Cather   [Stout #1096]


To Mr. PhillipsonDec. 23, 1943WCPM 

No, Thea Kronborg was modeled on a singer; was well acquainted with her. Yes, much of the required reading in schools was dull, such as Silas Lapham and The House of the Seven Gables. Doesn't agree that Silas Marner is dull, despite slow pace. Conveys much of England itself.   Willa Cather   [Stout #1649]