Bibliography of Willa Cather's Reading

This bibliography was created by Sharon Hoover and Melissa Ryan. They know that the existing work, though large, is incomplete, and they invite interested scholars, readers, and students to submit new works to the bibliography. To do so, please contact the editor of the Willa Cather Archive at . Any resource that attempts to be comprehensive depends upon a community of scholars, readers, and other interested parties.

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Total Number of Entries in Reading Bibliography: 1056

    James, Henry

  1. Author: James, Henry
    Title: The Better Sort
    Date: 1903
    Genre: fiction
    Note Relating to Cather: Cather says that the stories in The Better Sort are "complex and obscure."
    Note Source: A Calendar of the Letters of Willa Cather #85


  2. Author: James, Henry
    Title: "The Lesson of the Master"
    Date: 1892
    Genre: fiction
    Note Relating to Cather: "I have always thought [F. Marion Crawford] suggested Henry James' melancholy 'Lesson of the Master.'"
    Note Source: Courier 9/21/1895


  3. Author: James, Henry
    Title: In the Cage
    Date: 1898
    Genre: fiction
    Note Relating to Cather: "He treats the girl in the cage quite as respectfully as he would treat a princess of blood, and one feels the same courteous, unsparing hand that did such eminent justice to poor little Pinnie in The Princess Casamassima.
    Note Source: Leader 12/2/1898


  4. Author: James, Henry
    Title: Notes of a Son and Brother
    Date: 1914
    Genre: nonfiction
    Note Relating to Cather: James's new book is too mannered and has too little substance.
    Note Source: A Calendar of the Letters of Willa Cather #282


  5. Author: James, Henry
    Title: Terminations
    Date: 1895
    Genre: fiction
    Note Relating to Cather: "Now that Stevenson is dead I can think of but one English-speaking author who is really keeping his self-respect and sticking for perfection. Of course I refer to that mighty master of language and keen student of human actions and motives, Henry James. In the last four years he has published, I believe, just two small volumes, The Lesson of the Master and Terminations, and in those two little volumes of short stories he who will may find out something of what it means to be really an artist."
    Note Source: Courier 11/16/1895


  6. Author: James, Henry
    Title: The American
    Date: 1877
    Genre: fiction
    Note Relating to Cather:  "'Louie,' St. Peter spoke with deep feeling, 'do you happen to have read a novel of Henry James, The American? There's a rather nice scene in it, in which a young Frenchman, hurt in a duel, apologizes for the behaviour of his family. I'd like to do something of the sort.'"
    Note Source: The Professor's House Book 1, Chap. 16


  7. Author: James, Henry
    Title: The Awkward Age
    Date: 1899
    Genre: fiction
    Note Relating to Cather: Reading The Awkward Age with Isabelle.
    Note Source: A Calendar of the Letters of Willa Cather #290


  8. Author: James, Henry
    Title: The Middle Years
    Date: 1917
    Genre: nonfiction
    Note Relating to Cather: In an 1895 Courier article, Cather writes: "Well, as Henry James says, 'Our doubt is our passion and our passion is our task. The rest is the madness of art.'" In a Courier piece on artist Charles Stanley Reinhart, Cather observes that "the 'madness of art' had bitten the boy deeply"; the quote is from James' The Middle Years.
    Note Source: Courier 11/2/1895; Courier 10/23/1897


  9. Author: James, Henry
    Title: The Other House
    Date: 1896
    Genre: fiction
    Note Relating to Cather: "O, the interest, the terror, the tragedy, the passion of it! It is the sort of book that keeps one up until three o'clock in the morning."
    Note Source: Journal 12/20/1896


  10. Author: James, Henry
    Title: The Princess Casamassima
    Date: 1886
    Genre: fiction
    Note Relating to Cather: "He treats the girl in the cage quite as respectfully as he would treat a princess of blood, and one feels the same courteous, unsparing hand that did such eminent justice to poor little Pinnie in The Princess Casamassima.
    Note Source: Leader 12/2/1898


  11. Author: James, Henry
    Title: Tragic Muse
    Date: 1890
    Genre: fiction
    Note Relating to Cather: "Henry James' Tragic Muse is the only theatrical novel that has a particle of the real spirit of the stage in it."
    Note Source: Journal 3/29/1896


  12. Author: James, Henry
    Title: What Maisie Knew
    Date: 1897
    Genre: fiction
    Note Relating to Cather: On young runaway Adelaide Mould, daughter of comic opera star Marion Manola: "It recalled that unpleasant and masterly book of Henry James' about, What Maisie Knew to think what things those big, sad eyes had already seen, and the girl is only seventeen."
    Note Source: Courier 2/19/1898


  13. Author: James, Henry
    Date: 1915
    Genre: nonfiction
    Note Relating to Cather: Cather asks Sergeant if she has seen Henry James' article about Mrs. Fields in the June Atlantic.
    Note Source: A Calendar of the Letters of Willa Cather #310


  14. Author: James, Henry
    Note Relating to Cather: In an 1895 Courier article, Cather writes: "With the exception of Henry James and Hawthorne, Poe is our only master of great prose.... With the exception of Lowell, Poe is our only great poet." In a 1902 Journal article Cather remembers Henry James's affectionate description of the hotel she stays in while in Avignon, France.
    Note Source: Courier 10/12/1895; Journal 9/28/1902


  15. Author: James, Henry
    Title: Partial Portraits
    Date: 1888
    Genre: nonfiction
    Note Relating to Cather: Seibel and Cather agreed that Henry James "was a great critic, and [they] delved into all those Gallic writers of Partial Portraits and French Poets and Novelists--Balzac, Sand, Merimee, Maupassant--with occasional excursions into Dumas fils, Edouard Rod, intoxicating whiffs of Baudelaire and Richepin, deep draughts of young Rostand's ruby wine. Henry James was the guide whose hand held ours, and his critical standard was our polestar on those voyages."
    Note Source: Willa Cather Remembered 17


  16. Author: James, Henry
    Title: French Poets and Novelists
    Date: 1884
    Genre: nonfiction
    Note Relating to Cather: Seibel and Cather agreed that Henry James "was a great critic, and [they] delved into all those Gallic writers of Partial Portraits and French Poets and Novelists--Balzac, Sand, Merimee, Maupassant--with occasional excursions into Dumas fils, Edouard Rod, intoxicating whiffs of Baudelaire and Richepin, deep draughts of young Rostand's ruby wine. Henry James was the guide whose hand held ours, and his critical standard was our polestar on those voyages." In a 1899 article in the Leader, Cather writes, "Henry James regards the fact that Alfred de Musset did not visit Spain when he had the opportunity as one of the saddest proofs of his intellectual limitation, and finds de Musset's 'contented smallness of horizon' the most regrettable thing in his life."
    Note Source: Willa Cather Remembered 17; Leader 7/15/1899


  17. Author: James, Henry
    Title: The Beldonald Holbein
    Date: 1903
    Genre: fiction
    Note Relating to Cather: Thomas Beer remarks that Cather "was not immune to influences--who is?--and the excessively curious will find a phrase of "The Beldonald Holbein" and a simile from "The Pace of Youth" transmuted in this [Cather's] early work."
    Note Source: Willa Cather Remembered 80