Bibliography of Willa Cather's Reading

This bibliography was created by Sharon Hoover and Melissa Ryan. They know that the existing work, though large, is incomplete, and they invite interested scholars, readers, and students to submit new works to the bibliography. To do so, please contact the editor of the Willa Cather Archive at . Any resource that attempts to be comprehensive depends upon a community of scholars, readers, and other interested parties.

Select Author:

All authors are listed alphabetically by last name. Select a letter, or scroll through entire list.

A |  B |  C |  D |  E |  F |  G |  H |  I |  J |  K |  L |  M |  N |  O |  P |  Q |  R |  S |  T |  U |  V |  W |  Y |  Z |  View All Authors

Total Number of Entries in Reading Bibliography: 1056

    Kipling, Rudyard

  1. Author: Kipling, Rudyard
    Title: "At the End of the Passage"
    Date: 1891
    Genre: fiction
    Note Relating to Cather: Cather, on Bierce's "The Man and the Snake": "it haunts your memory and confronts you in the dark like Kipling's 'At the End of the Passage'"; the story is from Life's Handicap.
    Note Source: Leader 3/25/1898


  2. Author: Kipling, Rudyard
    Title: "Mandalay"
    Date: 1892
    Genre: poetry
    Note Relating to Cather: "At any rate, I should like to know how many of the men who boarded the transport for the Philippines were repeating "On the Road to Mandalay" under their breath." The poem appears in Barrack-Room Ballads, First Series.
    Note Source: Courier 8/24/1901


  3. Author: Kipling, Rudyard
    Title: "On the City Wall"
    Date: 1888
    Genre: fiction
    Note Relating to Cather: "He has been trying to live a respectable Puritan life in Vermont and be a full-fledged family man.... Go back to the east, Mr. Kipling; we and our world are not for you. Our life is not free enough for you and you are not strong enough for it.... Go back to the land where you wrote 'The Gate of a Hundred Sorrows' and 'Without Benefit of Clergy' and 'On the City Wall'.... Ah, Mr. Kipling, it would be sad and tragical if it were not so laughable that you who wrote 'The Story of the Gadsbys' should be the victim of matrimony. It has shorn the wings of your freedom, and your freedom was your art.... Alas! There were so many men who could have married Mrs. Kipling, and there was only you who could write Soldiers Three."
    Note Source: Journal 12/23/1894


  4. Author: Kipling, Rudyard
    Title: "One View of the Question"
    Date: 1893
    Genre: fiction
    Note Relating to Cather: Cather quotes this in her letter on England's "canal folk"; from Kipling's Many Inventions.
    Note Source: Journal 8/10/1902


  5. Author: Kipling, Rudyard
    Title: "Record of Badalia Herodsfoot"
    Date: 1893
    Genre: fiction
    Note Relating to Cather: Of the British shopgirl, Cather says: "Whoever thinks that Kipling exaggerated conditions in his 'Record of Badalia Herodsfoot,' let him come and see." The story is from Many Inventions.
    Note Source: Journal 8/10/1902


  6. Author: Kipling, Rudyard
    Title: "The Absent-Minded Beggar"
    Date: 1899
    Genre: poetry
    Note Relating to Cather: Cather quotes "The Absent-Minded Beggar" in her description of Lord Kitchener's troops' return from Africa.
    Note Source: Journal 10/19/1902


  7. Author: Kipling, Rudyard
    Title: "The Gate of a Hundred Sorrows"
    Date: 1888
    Genre: fiction
    Note Relating to Cather: "He has been trying to live a respectable Puritan life in Vermont and be a full-fledged family man.... Go back to the east, Mr. Kipling; we and our world are not for you. Our life is not free enough for you and you are not strong enough for it.... Go back to the land where you wrote 'The Gate of a Hundred Sorrows' and 'Without Benefit of Clergy' and 'On the City Wall'....Ah, Mr. Kipling, it would be sad and tragical if it were not so laughable that you who wrote 'The Story of the Gadsbys' should be the victim of matrimony. It has shorn the wings of your freedom, and your freedom was your art.... Alas! There were so many men who could have married Mrs. Kipling, and there was only you who could write Soldiers Three."
    Note Source: Journal 12/23/1894


  8. Author: Kipling, Rudyard
    Title: "To James Whitcomb Riley"
    Date: 1890
    Genre: poetry
    Note Relating to Cather: Cather used Kipling's poem as an epigraph for her Home Monthly column.
    Note Source: Home Monthly 12/1897


  9. Author: Kipling, Rudyard
    Title: "Without Benefit of Clergy"
    Date: 1891
    Genre: fiction
    Note Relating to Cather: "He has been trying to live a respectable Puritan life in Vermont and be a full-fledged family man.... Go back to the east, Mr. Kipling; we and our world are not for you. Our life is not free enough for you and you are not strong enough for it.... Go back to the land where you wrote 'The Gate of a Hundred Sorrows' and 'Without Benefit of Clergy' and 'On the City Wall'.... Ah, Mr. Kipling, it would be sad and tragical if it were not so laughable that you who wrote 'The Story of the Gadsbys' should be the victim of matrimony. It has shorn the wings of your freedom, and your freedom was your art.... Alas! There were so many men who could have married Mrs. Kipling, and there was only you who could write Soldiers Three."
    Note Source: Journal 12/23/1894


  10. Author: Kipling, Rudyard
    Title: Captains Courageous
    Date: 1896
    Genre: fiction
    Note Relating to Cather: In an 1897 Home Monthly article Cather writes: "Rudyard Kipling's latest novel, Captains Courageous, is a book that every American boy and every American father should read." In an 1899 Courier article Cather writes: "Had Captains Courageous and The Day's Work been his first productions they would have made, doubtless, a noise in the world, but they would not have done for their author what Plain Tales from the Hills and Soldiers Three did."
    Note Source: Home Monthly 12/1897; Courier 4/4/1899


  11. Author: Kipling, Rudyard
    Title: Mine Own People
    Date: 1891
    Genre: fiction
    Note Relating to Cather: "The nucleus of Anglo-Indian society was formed when Clive's troopers marched into the interior, yet no one knew anything about it until the appearance of Soldiers Three and Mine Own People."
    Note Source: Courier 4/4/1899


  12. Author: Kipling, Rudyard
    Title: Plain Tales from the Hills
    Date: 1888
    Genre: fiction
    Note Relating to Cather: "Had Captains Courageous and The Day's Work been his first productions they would have made, doubtless, a noise in the world, but they would not have done for their author what Plain Tales from the Hills and Soldiers Three did.
    Note Source: Courier 4/4/1899


  13. Author: Kipling, Rudyard
    Title: Soldiers Three
    Date: 1888
    Genre: fiction
    Note Relating to Cather: In an 1894 Journal article, Cather writes: "He has been trying to live a respectable Puritan life in Vermont and be a full-fledged family man.... Go back to the east, Mr. Kipling; we and our world are not for you. Our life is not free enough for you and you are not strong enough for it.... Go back to the land where you wrote 'The Gate of a Hundred Sorrows' and 'Without Benefit of Clergy' and 'On the City Wall'.... Ah, Mr. Kipling, it would be sad and tragical if it were not so laughable that you who wrote 'The Story of the Gadsbys' should be the victim of matrimony. It has shorn the wings of your freedom, and your freedom was your art.... Alas! There were so many men who could have married Mrs. Kipling, and there was only you who could write Soldiers Three." In an 1899 Courier article, Cather writes: "The nucleus of Anglo-Indian society was formed when Clive's troopers marched into the interior, yet no one knew anything about it until the appearance of Soldiers Three and Mine Own People." In an 1899 Courier article, Cather writes: "Had Captains Courageous and The Day's Work been his first productions they would have made, doubtless, a noise in the world, but they would not have done for their author what Plain Tales from the Hills and Soldiers Three did.
    Note Source: Journal 12/23/1894; Courier 4/4/1899; Courier 4/4/1899


  14. Author: Kipling, Rudyard
    Title: The Day's Work
    Date: 1898
    Genre: fiction
    Note Relating to Cather: In an 1899 Courier article Cather writes: "No man has ever written more persistently or more vividly of the affairs which engage the daily life of men," but "Mr. Kipling's experimental playfulness of mood seems to have affected his workmanship." In an 1899 Courier article Cather writes:"Had Captains Courageous and The Day's Work been his first productions they would have made, doubtless, a noise in the world, but they would not have done for their author what Plain Tales from the Hills and Soldiers Three did.
    Note Source: Courier 4/4/1899; Courier 4/4/1899


  15. Author: Kipling, Rudyard
    Title: The Light That Failed
    Date: 1890
    Genre: fiction
    Note Relating to Cather: "I could understand the hero of The Light that Failed having possessions in a dream world and riding the Thirty-Mile Ride with Maisie, but I cannot understand it in Georgie Cottar and the girl who lisped [in "The Brushwood Boy" (The Day's Work)]."
    Note Source: Courier 4/4/1899


  16. Author: Kipling, Rudyard
    Title: The Seven Seas
    Date: 1896
    Genre: poetry
    Note Relating to Cather: "It has all the freshness and vividness of a man who knows the world, a bigger, wilder part of the world than ours, and who has seen with a perception strangely keen and sympathetic into all the experiences of men. But compare it, if you will, with Keats' 'St. Agnes Eve,' or with anything of Shelley's. Then would you wish to place Kipling among the immortal bards?"
    Note Source: Journal 5/16/1897


  17. Author: Kipling, Rudyard
    Title: The Story of the Gadsbys
    Date: 1888
    Genre: fiction
    Note Relating to Cather: In an 1894 Journal article Cather writes: "He has been trying to live a respectable Puritan life in Vermont and be a full-fledged family man.... Go back to the east, Mr. Kipling; we and our world are not for you. Our life is not free enough for you and you are not strong enough for it.... Go back to the land where you wrote 'The Gate of a Hundred Sorrows' and 'Without Benefit of Clergy' and 'On the City Wall'.... Ah, Mr. Kipling, it would be sad and tragical if it were not so laughable that you who wrote 'The Story of the Gadsbys' should be the victim of matrimony. It has shorn the wings of your freedom, and your freedom was your art.... Alas! There were so many men who could have married Mrs. Kipling, and there was only you who could write Soldiers Three." In an 1899 Courier article Cather writes: "[Kipling] is dangerously clever and has a taste for farce, and these two propensities lead him into many a tour de force unworthy of his high talent. Admitting that the Mrs. Hauksbee stories were cheap in their knowingness; that The Story of the Gadsbys was an atrocious precocity in a youth of twenty, they were better worth doing than Tom Brown schoolboy stories, or the conversation of horses in a Vermont pasture."
    Note Source: Journal 12/23/1894; Courier 4/4/1899


  18. Author: Kipling, Rudyard
    Note Relating to Cather: "Yet these two men [Kipling and Zola], different as they are, are the only living writers who have at their command the virility of the epic manner, unless one include the author of With Fire and Sword."
    Note Source: Courier 4/4/1899