Bibliography of Willa Cather's Reading

This bibliography was created by Sharon Hoover and Melissa Ryan. They know that the existing work, though large, is incomplete, and they invite interested scholars, readers, and students to submit new works to the bibliography. To do so, please contact the editor of the Willa Cather Archive at . Any resource that attempts to be comprehensive depends upon a community of scholars, readers, and other interested parties.

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Total Number of Entries in Reading Bibliography: 1056

    Stevenson, Robert Louis

  1. Author: Stevenson, Robert Louis
    Title: "Sing Me a Song"
    Date: 1886
    Genre: poetry
    Note Relating to Cather: In "The Treasure of Far Island," Douglass Burnham recalls a line from Stevenson when he sees the island from the train taking him home: "Once on a day he sailed away, over the sea to Skye."
    Note Source: Collected Short Fiction 1892-1912 266


  2. Author: Stevenson, Robert Louis
    Title: "Where Go the Boats"
    Date: 1885
    Genre: poetry
    Note Relating to Cather: Cather quotes the entire first stanza at the beginning of "The Treasure of Far Island" ("Dark brown is the river . . . ") and the first line of stanza two at the beginning of part two: "Green leaves a-floating." One can look for many allusions to Stevenson throughout that story.
    Note Source: Collected Short Fiction 1892-1912 265, 276


  3. Author: Stevenson, Robert Louis
    Title: David Balfour
    Date: 1893
    Genre: fiction
    Note Relating to Cather: "It is probable that before the advancement of encroaching realism and 'veritism' and all other literary unpleasantness Stevenson will be relegated to the children's bookshelves, along with Scott and Cooper and the elder Dumas....Prince Otto is so seldom mentioned by people whose business it is to mention books that it may be very bad taste to like it. But it has a few very staunch admirers and ought to have many more.... It is not the finished book that The Master of Ballentrae or David Balfour is, but anyone who has read and liked [Alphonse] Daudet's Kings in Exile [1879] will find in Prince Otto deep and lasting pleasure."
    Note Source: Journal 12/23/1894


  4. Author: Stevenson, Robert Louis
    Title: Familiar Studies of Men and Books
    Date: 1882
    Genre: nonfiction
    Note Relating to Cather: "As Stevenson said of Thoreau, he was not a man to love, for he was 'not touched with the feeling of our infirmities.'"
    Note Source: Leader 7/15/1899


  5. Author: Stevenson, Robert Louis
    Title: Kidnapped
    Date: 1886
    Genre: fiction
    Note Relating to Cather: In a letter, Cather recommends Stevenson's Kidnapped for students. In One of Ours, Claude Wheeler recognizes the heather in France from his reading of Kidnapped.
    Note Source: A Calendar of the Letters of Willa Cather #1306; One of Ours Book V, Chap. 6


  6. Author: Stevenson, Robert Louis
    Title: Prince Otto
    Date: 1885
    Genre: fiction
    Note Relating to Cather: "It is probable that before the advancement of encroaching realism and 'veritism' and all other literary unpleasantness Stevenson will be relegated to the children's bookshelves, along with Scott and Cooper and the elder Dumas....Prince Otto is so seldom mentioned by people whose business it is to mention books that it may be very bad taste to like it. But it has a few very staunch admirers and ought to have many more.... It is not the finished book that The Master of Ballentrae or David Balfour is, but anyone who has read and liked [Alphonse] Daudet's Kings in Exile [1879] will find in Prince Otto deep and lasting pleasure."
    Note Source: Journal 12/23/1894


  7. Author: Stevenson, Robert Louis
    Title: The Master of Ballantrae
    Date: 1889
    Genre: fiction
    Note Relating to Cather: In an 1894 Journal article, Cather writes: "It is probable that before the advancement of encroaching realism and 'veritism' and all other literary unpleasantness Stevenson will be relegated to the children's bookshelves, along with Scott and Cooper and the elder Dumas....Prince Otto is so seldom mentioned by people whose business it is to mention books that it may be very bad taste to like it. But it has a few very staunch admirers and ought to have many more.... It is not the finished book that The Master of Ballentrae or David Balfour is, but anyone who has read and liked [Alphonse] Daudet's Kings in Exile [1879] will find in Prince Otto deep and lasting pleasure." In a 1901 Courier article, Cather writes: "While young men were scurrying about the world in search of material and adventure, the best of adventure stories came from the sick bed with blood-stained linen where Stevenson wrote Treasure Island and The Master of Ballantrae."
    Note Source: Journal 12/23/1894; Courier 8/17/1901


  8. Author: Stevenson, Robert Louis
    Title: The Wrecker
    Date: 1892
    Genre: fiction
    Note Relating to Cather: "For the most part [mystery stories] are read and thrown aside and forgotten as quickly as a puzzle that is solved, for they contain none of the elements of lasting satisfaction. Of course there are notable exceptions. ... But of all the stories of mystery, old and new, give us The Wrecker, by that master of the art of telling a good tale, Robert Louis Stevenson."
    Note Source: Journal 3/22/1896


  9. Author: Stevenson, Robert Louis
    Title: Treasure Island
    Date: 1883
    Genre: fiction
    Note Relating to Cather: In an 1897 Home Monthly article, Cather writes: "I received a few days ago a letter from one of our readers asking what book I would most highly recommend for a boy of fourteen. Of course, there is no 'best' boy's book, but I replied without hesitation Robert Louis Stevenson's Treasure Island." In a 1901 Courier article, Cather writes: "While young men were scurrying about the world in search of material and adventure, the best of adventure stories came from the sick bed with blood-stained linen where Stevenson wrote Treasure Island and The Master of Ballantrae."
    Note Source: Home Monthly 2/1897; Courier 8/17/1901


  10. Author: Stevenson, Robert Louis
    Title: Underwoods
    Date: 1887
    Genre: poetry
    Note Relating to Cather: At a dinner with Will H. Low, to whom poem XI of Underwoods was written: "When a seasonable opportunity came, I quoted a phrase or two of some verses that Stevenson once wrote to Mr. Low."
    Note Source: Courier 10/30/1897


  11. Author: Stevenson, Robert Louis
    Title: Vailima Letters
    Date: 1895
    Genre: nonfiction
    Note Relating to Cather: On the Vailima Letters of Stevenson to his friend Sidney Colvin: "If you want to read some noble and manly literature, just glance over those letters of his in the November McClure's."
    Note Source: Courier 11/2/1895


  12. Author: Stevenson, Robert Louis
    Note Relating to Cather: According to a letter, Cather would like the type in her collected edition to resemble that in the Thistle Edition of Stevenson. In an 1899 Courier article Cather writes: "There was a time when a certain cheerful gentleman, one Robert Louis Stevenson, wrote tales of the highland and the heather ... Ah! Those were indeed the days 'when the wind was blowin' bonny in the North Countree!'" According to a 1901 Journal article, Cather says of Dumas' Camille that Marguerite "dies, in short, of being herself, as Stevenson said of Robert Burns."
    Note Source: A Calendar of the Letters of Willa Cather #1339; Courier 7/29/1899; Journal 2/4/1901