A Calendar of the Letters of Willa Cather

24 letters found

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Results 11-20:

To Cyril Clemens1934? typed commentary about Mark Twain with hand corrections [possibly the material referred to in no. 1214] ; WCPM 

Once met a Russian violinist who said he would greatly like to see the Mississippi River. He grew up near the Volga and had read Huckleberry Finn in translation as a boy and wondered if the Mississippi was like the Volga. Hard to imagine how the regional colloquialism of the book could be translated into Russian. But the book has enough vitality to shine through even botched language.   [Stout #1213]

To Mr. OliverDec. 13, 1934PM 

Too tired of answering questions from men writing books on creative writing to answer his. Silly to try to teach it anyway. People should be taught to write clear, correct English and let creative writing take care of itself.   Willa Cather   [Stout #1243]

To Cyril ClemensJan. 10, 1935UVa 

Very glad to receive the Mark Twain medal and his account of the dinner.   Willa Cather   [Stout #1248]

To William Lyon PhelpsFeb. 17, 1936Beinecke 

Has read his article on Mark Twain in the Yale Review. Knew Mark Twain in his last years. Has always found the Van Wyck Brooks book about him grossly inaccurate. Glad to hear Phelps thinks so, too. If Brooks had been able to spend five minutes talking with the grand old man in his bed, he would have written differently.   Willa Cather   [Stout #1298]

To Mrs. William Stix [Yaltah Menuhin],  Monday [Jan. 23, 1939] , from New YorkPrinceton 

Weather very cold, but still walks around the reservoir [in Central Park]. Misses her. Is dealing with a great deal of business, particularly the effort to prevent publication of a poor translation of Death Comes for the Archbishop into French. Is sending James M. Barrie's The Boy David but suggests she first read First and Second Samuel in the Bible. One needs to know the Biblical story in order to enjoy the play. Is glad Barrie liked Archbishop. P.S.: Has just reread First and Second Samuel and the young David is delightful. Psalms of David are splendid poetry, too.  Aunt Willa   [Stout #1435]

To Mr. Gardiner,  n.d. [c. Feb. 15, 1941? Perhaps 1942, given publication of Columbus book] , excerpt made by E. K. Brown ; Beinecke 

Liked his magazine article "Modern Authors Can Be Gentlemen" and appreciated his comment on her. Steinbeck and Saroyan do not use the full range of the English language, but only write in monosyllables. Samuel Morison manages to use even ordinary slang in such a way that it fits the need of the moment, without destroying the dignity of his writing. Enjoyed Morison's book about Columbus [1942]; had not known the role of religion in Columbus's life.   [Stout #1527]

To Ferris GreensletApr. 19, 1941Harvard 

Everyone she knows who went to Florida for the winter got sick. Survived New York winter with no worse than colds. High spirits impossible these days, with the world as it is. Isabelle McClung's brother was wise to marry a member of the Mellon family—his only wise deed. He was good-looking but otherwise a disappointment.   Willa Cather   [Stout #1537]

To Alfred KnopfJune 20, [1944]HRC 

Shocked to learn of his father's death. Greatly respected him—as she also does Alfred. Thinks of them both as people of quality.   Willa Cather   [Stout #1672]

[To Elsie Cather, sister] [October 20, 1937] ; partial letter, top of page cut off and possibly pages missing ; UNL-Rosowski Cather 

. . . On another topic, has just started a novel and needs a book their father had. He tried to give it to her, but she did not want to take a book so personally valuable to him, especially while living at the Grosvenor. Doesn't want to have it forever, as it should be in father's home, but could really use it for a time. Please ask Carrie Sherwood to get it and send it. It's called The History of the Valley, and it was written by Andrew Kerchival or Andrew Kerchway [The book is A History of the Valley of Virginia by Samuel Kercheval, and this copy is also part of the Rosowski Cather Collection at UNL]. Father rebound the book and stored it in the back parlor secretary. If Carrie has trouble finding it, perhaps Elsie could retrieve it when she goes to Red Cloud for the dedication of their mother's window [a window in Grace Episcopal Church] on All Saints' Day. Will return it in the spring.   Willie 

To Bess Seymour [January 21?, 1906] UNL-Rosowski Cather 

Thanks for the letter about the baby [probably Mary Virginia Auld, niece, born November 11, 1905], who likely had a rich Christmas. Had a good trip to New York, but unfortunately was too busy to see the Wieners. Will someday show Bess the beautiful dress she bought for the dinner [Cather attended a dinner at Delmonico's in New York celebrating the 70th birthday of Mark Twain in December 1905]. Auntie Gore's letter said that Douglass Clark has nine children, that Perry's kids are living in Winchester and Walter works at a bank, and Howard Gore's wife is wintering in Switzerland and sending Sidney to school there. Auntie doesn't seem to enjoy their living abroad. Was good of Alec Bentley to visit his father. Is Mrs. Governor Garber still in Red Cloud? Sends affection to everyone, particularly the baby. Tell Mollie hello and please write and get Jess to write, too. PS: Is wearing garters Jess gave her. Received many Christmas gifts, including silk stockings, a leather bag, a pin, hand-embroidered clothing, and books.  Willie 

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