A Calendar of the Letters of Willa Cather

213 letters found

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Results 11-20:

To Zoë AkinsJan. 27, 1909, on McClure's letterhead ; Huntington 

Great to hear from her. Enjoyed the story about the droll Negroes—a people rich in imagination. Can't use the poems. Wonders when Zoë will settle down to serious work for theater. Her own interest in theater has waned. Best wishes in her work, whatever it is.   Willa Sibert Cather   [Stout #151]

To Zoë Akins,  n.d. [early 1909?] , from 82 Washington Place, New YorkHuntington 

Sorry for the tactless letter. Still not used to having to reject things. Glad she likes April Twilights. Thinks "The Palatine," published in McClure's the previous summer, is better than poems in the book. Suggests Zoë study Miss Guiney's work as a model of richness combined with restraint.   Willa Sibert Cather   [Stout #152]

To Annie Adams FieldsJune 27, 1909, from LondonHarvard 

Learned of their terrible loss [of Sarah Orne Jewett] yesterday. Cannot accept that Jewett is not still there. Knows how fearful Jewett had been of losing Fields; had loved her so dearly for so long. Sailing next week. Will let her know as soon as she lands in New York. Shares her grief.   Willa   [Stout #162]

To Annie Adams FieldsJuly 13, [1909], from aboard the Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse ; Harvard 

Her letter was a comfort, especially the account of how peaceful Jewett was. Keeps dreaming they are both still there together. Receipt of this letter will show she has landed.    Willa   [Stout #163]

To Mrs. George P. Cather [Aunt Franc]Jan. 5, 1910, from 82 Washington Place, New YorkUNL-Ray 

Wishing her a belated happy New Year. Has been managing the magazine by herself since returning to New York in the fall. Has been unwell, so has had not only little time but little energy. Isabelle McClung with her from early November through Christmas; helped a great deal with shopping and the training of a new maid, so the apartment is now very pleasant. Always feels homesick at Christmas; seems everyone in New York suffers from homesickness then. Last year went to the children's service at Trinity Church on Christmas Eve and people were crying all around her. Probably wishing to be back at some small town. Is glad Jack and Elsie put out holly and evergreens in the cemetery for her at Christmas. Both such nice children. Elsie will be nicer when she gets older and not so sure of herself. Enjoys thinking of Bessie [Elizabeth Seymour] and Auntie [Sarah Andrews, sister of Mary Virginia Cather] being together and less burdened by care. Used to find it so hard not being able to do anything for them. Mother seems in better spirits lately. Is anticipating a Grand Jury investigation as a result of McClure's articles on Tammany and prostitution. Expects to go to London again in a few months but hopes to get back to Nebraska in the summer. Hopes to have as nice a visit as this past summer, when Mother did not seem to begrudge her visiting in the country. Please let her known if Bess and Auntie need anything. Sends love and best wishes.   Willie   [Stout #168]

To Mrs. George P. Cather [Aunt Franc]Feb. 22, 1911UNL-Ray 

Another busy winter. Elsie made her first visit to New York at Christmas; they had a wonderful time except for worrying about Mother, who'd hurt herself in a fall. Elsie liked the apartment and the colored maid, who has taken over all housekeeping cares. Health is better this winter, though working all summer while Mr. McClure was ill in Europe wore her down. Had some time away to recuperate in the fall. Saw Mr. Wiener a few weeks ago; he is still himself, in spite of having made so much money. Isabelle visiting and sends her greeting. Hears from Howard Gore that he is going to the coronation of the king of Siam, whom he knew years ago. Wishes he wouldn't pursue aristocrats, but vanity seems endemic to Washington. Hears that Bessie and Auntie are well, and that she and Uncle George are too. May have to go to England in April. Hopes to receive a letter from her before going.   Willie   [Stout #188]

To Sara TeasdaleMay 9, 1911UVa 

Sorry to have been away when she was in town; would have enjoyed seeing her. Liked her poem in the May Scribner's. Will stop off in St. Louis someday to see her and [Zoë] Akins.   Willa Sibert Cather   [Stout #191]

To Zoë AkinsFeb. 6, 1912, from BostonHuntington 

Hasn't received her book of poetry. Has been in the hospital. Now with Margaret Deland, reading proofs flat in bed.   Willa Sibert Cather   [Stout #211]

To Zoë AkinsMar. 14, 1912, from PittsburghHuntington 

Both copies of Zoë's poems have arrived. Appreciates the inscription. Sorry to have been cross at times, but was worn out. Will never let herself be so worn down again. Likes "City and Country" best, also "Where Joy Passed By" and "Ask Me No More." Hates the pictures for "Alexander." The book will look better. Hopes she will like "The Bohemian Girl," a much better story though probably few will like it as well.   Willa Sibert Cather   [Stout #218]

To Zoë AkinsOct. 31, [1912?], from PittsburghUVa 

Don't overwork while running a temperature. Glad she likes "The Bohemian Girl." Feels pretty good about it. Is doing a longer story with the same setting; actually, setting is the main character. Saw Arnold Bennett's Milestones in New York. Wishes the office would quit interrupting her work.   W. S. C.   [Stout #246]

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