A Calendar of the Letters of Willa Cather

70 letters found

Search parameters

previous - next

Results 11-20:

To Mrs. George P. Cather [Aunt Franc]Nov. 17, [1914], from PittsburghUNL-Ray  copy at WCPM

Has been working well. Expects to be in Pittsburgh until Christmas. Jack doing well at school; sees him often. War occupies all conversation. A friend from Belgium, Mme Flahant, is in New York and says her family members in Brussels are starving. The Belgian Relief Committee in London says that only the U.S. can sustain Belgium through the winter. Germans allow no food in that comes through England or France. Will donate to the relief fund instead of sending Christmas presents. America will have to answer to history if it fails Belgium.   Willie   [Stout #289]

To Mrs. George P. Cather [Aunt Franc]June 16, [1915]UNL-Ray 

Is sending a chain letter for her to pass on to three friends. Is correcting proofs for new book to be published in the fall. Expects to be in Nebraska in September and will come for a visit.   Willie   [Stout #309]

To Mrs. George P. Cather [Aunt Franc]Dec. 25, 1915, from PittsburghUNL-Ray 

Is sending her love on this special day. Since Isabelle McClung has lost her father as well as her mother and this house (which has been almost a home to her [Cather] for fifteen years) is to be sold, it is her last Christmas there. May never feel so secure in any other house. Even her apartment in New York, pleasant as it is, is not a home in the way this was. Has been spending some time with Jack during the school vacation. New book enjoying good sales as well as favorable reviews. Is eager to get to work on a new one.   Willa    [Stout #343]

To Mrs. George P. Cather [Aunt Franc],  Saturday [pm. July 14, 1917] , from Red Cloud, Nebr.UNL-Ray 

Father so enjoyed listening to Will Andrews's new Victrola that they stayed too late to get by Bladen before going home. It was almost dark when they got back to Red Cloud. Will come to visit next week, before Jack has to leave.   Willie   [Stout #389]

To Mrs. George P. Cather [Aunt Franc]Sept. 9, [pm. 1917], from the Shattuck Inn, Jaffrey, N.H.UNL-Ray 

Understands her regret that G. P. has enlisted, but he has always wanted to be in the military and this is his chance. It's a time of return to basics: men carrying guns. For herself, feels proud of him and glad he can go, especially as an officer. Wishes Jack were going. Was sorry not to see her, but the heat was debilitating and she and her friend fled back East. Was too worn out to work for a while, but now is working every morning in a tent about a mile from the inn. Douglass's reports about Mother are disheartening. Wonders if she should go to California to see about her. Address is at Hotel Garfield on O'Farrell Street in San Francisco. Elsie is delighted with her school and with Albuquerque. On the whole, families are pretty good things to have.   Willa   [Stout #390]

To Mrs. George P. Cather [Aunt Franc]Sept. 19, [1917], from Jaffrey, N.H.UNL-Ray 

Sending a letter from Elsie she will enjoy.  P.S.: Will be home on Bank Street about Oct. 1.  Willa   [Stout #392]

To Mrs. George P. Cather [Aunt Franc],  n.d. [June 26, 1918] , from New YorkUNL-Ray 

Knows she must be thanking God for a son who could make them all so proud with his courageous deeds, showing he was a true man and not an inferior one. She and Uncle George are the only ones who deserve the glory he has brought to the family [referring to a newspaper notice of G. P.'s death on the parapet of a trench].   Willie   [Stout #418]

To Mrs. George P. Cather [Aunt Franc]June 12, [1918], from New YorkUNL-Ray 

Feels inadequate to write, but wants her to know that her loss [of Grosvenor] is present in her thoughts. Everything else seemed to fade into unreality when she saw G. P.'s name in the newspaper under the heading "killed in action"—a title that sets men apart in glory. Now feels she carries a name of honor because it was his name. It was Isabelle who showed her the newspaper notice. Somehow, had not believed he would be harmed in the war. Knows she must be glad he found his mission in life. Remembers talking with him about the war news in August, 1914. He was not content on the farm; this great endeavor was the kind of effort he needed and craved. Very few men have both the courage and the ability to serve the country in this great challenge as he did. Sends love and sympathy.   Willie   [Stout #419]

To Ferris GreensletJuly 2, [1918], from the Shattuck Inn, Jaffrey, N.H.Harvard 

Enclosing proofs of cuts with instructions. Progressing well with proofs. Why did the copyeditor change Mama to Mamma and eliminate subjunctives? Shouldn't be charged for restoring those. Did he see the notice that her cousin, Lt. Grosvenor Cather, was killed in action on May 28?   W. S. C.   [Stout #421]

To Mrs. George P. Cather [Aunt Franc]Nov. 11, [1918]UNL-Ray 

Thinking of her on this day of peace. For the first time in all history the sun rose on a world without monarchies. A fulfillment of Ralph Waldo Emerson's prediction that God would one day say He was tired of kings. Wishes Grosvenor had lived to see it, but he is now God's soldier, as the line in Macbeth says. The old is gone for good. Now more than ever the flag belongs in churches.   Willie   [Stout #440]

previous - next