A Calendar of the Letters of Willa Cather

193 letters found

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Results 11-20:

To Elizabeth Moorhead VermorckenSept. 25, [1908]PM 

Very sorry to hear of the death of her father. Another sorrow after such a hard two years. Must be very hard for her mother. Hopes to see her in Pittsburgh some time this fall. Sends condolences.    Willa Cather   [Stout #139]

To Mrs. George P. Cather [Aunt Franc]Jan. 5, 1910, from 82 Washington Place, New YorkUNL-Ray 

Wishing her a belated happy New Year. Has been managing the magazine by herself since returning to New York in the fall. Has been unwell, so has had not only little time but little energy. Isabelle McClung with her from early November through Christmas; helped a great deal with shopping and the training of a new maid, so the apartment is now very pleasant. Always feels homesick at Christmas; seems everyone in New York suffers from homesickness then. Last year went to the children's service at Trinity Church on Christmas Eve and people were crying all around her. Probably wishing to be back at some small town. Is glad Jack and Elsie put out holly and evergreens in the cemetery for her at Christmas. Both such nice children. Elsie will be nicer when she gets older and not so sure of herself. Enjoys thinking of Bessie [Elizabeth Seymour] and Auntie [Sarah Andrews, sister of Mary Virginia Cather] being together and less burdened by care. Used to find it so hard not being able to do anything for them. Mother seems in better spirits lately. Is anticipating a Grand Jury investigation as a result of McClure's articles on Tammany and prostitution. Expects to go to London again in a few months but hopes to get back to Nebraska in the summer. Hopes to have as nice a visit as this past summer, when Mother did not seem to begrudge her visiting in the country. Please let her known if Bess and Auntie need anything. Sends love and best wishes.   Willie   [Stout #168]

To Elizabeth Shepley SergeantJan. 26, 1910 on McClure's letterhead [bears notes taken by Sergeant regarding McClure's preferences for the magazine ] PM

Received her letter this morning. Will be in the office tomorrow and expects to see her about nine.    Willa Sibert Cather   [Stout #169]

To Elizabeth Shepley SergeantApr. 5, 1910, on McClure's letterhead ; PM 

Her article only needs a little cutting. Will mark cuts and other suggested changes and send by Monday. Check for $200 in a few days. No need to postpone sailing.   Willa Sibert Cather   [Stout #173]

To Elizabeth Shepley SergeantMay 31, 1910, on McClure's letterhead ; PM 

Sorry the proofs went astray, but proofed the article thoroughly herself. Can't use more than one article about the Labor Congress. Emphasis should be on developments abroad for protection of workers. Can pay $150 for article and photographs. If Sergeant gets to Berlin might visit Permanent Exposition for the Welfare of Workingmen and feature some of the exhibits there. Miss Wyatt preparing article on the working girl, so not sure they could use another on French working girls. Seems as if the whole city is being demolished and rebuilt these days.   Willa Sibert Cather   [Stout #179]

To Elizabeth Shepley SergeantJuly 6, 1910, on McClure's letterhead ; PM 

Sending an item from the New York Evening Post that casts doubt on accuracy of her article. With [Josephine] Goldmark, is taking it up with the Child Labor Commission. Wonderful Sergeant got this notice. Still wondering what she thinks of the workmen's museum idea. Can pay $200 for the article plus $50 toward travel expenses.   Willa Sibert Cather   [Stout #181]

To Elizabeth Shepley Sergeant,  Friday [early 1911?] PM 

Not feeling well, and now Miss Lewis isn't also. She had better not come.   W. S. C   [Stout #187]

To Mrs. George P. Cather [Aunt Franc]Feb. 22, 1911UNL-Ray 

Another busy winter. Elsie made her first visit to New York at Christmas; they had a wonderful time except for worrying about Mother, who'd hurt herself in a fall. Elsie liked the apartment and the colored maid, who has taken over all housekeeping cares. Health is better this winter, though working all summer while Mr. McClure was ill in Europe wore her down. Had some time away to recuperate in the fall. Saw Mr. Wiener a few weeks ago; he is still himself, in spite of having made so much money. Isabelle visiting and sends her greeting. Hears from Howard Gore that he is going to the coronation of the king of Siam, whom he knew years ago. Wishes he wouldn't pursue aristocrats, but vanity seems endemic to Washington. Hears that Bessie and Auntie are well, and that she and Uncle George are too. May have to go to England in April. Hopes to receive a letter from her before going.   Willie   [Stout #188]

To Elizabeth Shepley Sergeant,  Sunday [pm. June 4, 1911] , from New YorkPM 

Thanks for the box of candy. Someone from Hull House was at the office and said Miss Wyatt is obsessed with white slavery these days. Too bad she can't see anything amusing in humanity. Miss McClung to be in town soon and Miss Goldmark not long after. Wishes Sergeant could be there to meet Isabelle, who also dislikes people obsessed with social reform.   Willa Cather   [Stout #195]

To Elizabeth Shepley SergeantJune 27, 1911, from South Berwick, MainePM 

So glad she liked the stories. They now seem distant and ill tempered. But appreciates the good words. Here, can forget the present and its troubles. Returning tomorrow.   Willa Cather   [Stout #199]

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