A Calendar of the Letters of Willa Cather

21 letters found

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Results 11-20:

To Prof. Hugo Munsterberg,  [in Berlin] May 13, 1911BPL 

The four articles too much like essays for McClure's. Rejected the idea for a piece on German theater for that very reason. Mr. McClure believes German methods superior to those of the U.S. and wants something informative along that line. Perhaps after he returns, he can provide that kind of thing?   Willa Sibert Cather   [Stout #192]

To Prof. Hugo Munsterberg [ in Berlin ]July 17, 1911, on McClure's letterhead ; BPL 

Mr. McClure will decide about the articles when he gets back. Expects him in a few days.   Willa Sibert Cather   [Stout #201]

To Mariel GereAug. 21, [1929?], from Grand MananWCPM 

Wanted to let her know about Professor Bates. Saw him very little after he left the university. He remained boyish and yet matured, a very gentle person and quite individual.   Willa   [Stout #977]

To Albert G. FeuilleratNov. 6, 1929Yale 

Sending her publisher's pamphlet with biographical information and a list of books with information about her and her work. Has marked the two best. Hard to answer his question about French influence. From adolescence and for many years thereafter read and liked French prose writers from Hugo to Maupassant. Read all of Balzac more than once before the age of twenty, though not much now. Doesn't believe she ever imitated any French writer, but did admire them more than their English contemporaries because of freer experimentation and greater thematic range. Tone of British writers of that period, before Hardy, sometimes mechanical or patronizing, though it doesn't really bother her. Believes French language itself more exciting to her than English when she was younger. Now prefers Prosper Merimée to the others. Likes his reserve, as well as other qualities. P.S.: Suggests he read "The Novel Démeublé."  Willa Cather   [Stout #988]

To Irene Miner Weisz,  Saturday [Oct. 29, 1932] , from Grosvenor Hotel, New YorkNewberry 

Appreciates the candy. Is sending Hugo's latest letter. He seems in a little better spirits.[With letter from Hugo Pavelka dated October 24, thanking her for referring him to Bernard McNeny for advice.]   Willie   [Stout #1129]

To Zoë Akins [Mrs. Hugo Rumbold]Nov. 21, [1932]Huntington 

Shocked to hear of Hugo's death. At least they had a little time. After one is forty-five death seems to rain down, and after fifty it becomes a storm. Should let her daily routine carry her along, and avoid alcohol for now. Would like to come to California to be with her, but has an eye infection. Also, has just signed a lease on an apartment—570 Park Avenue. Hang on, and time will restore her.   Willa   [Stout #1132]

To Zoë AkinsDec. 22, [1932], from 570 Park Avenue, New YorkHuntington 

She and Edith have had one problem after another since moving in, including broken water pipe. Visiting niece is staying in hotel. Her last letter talks about Hugo's good points and her own faults. He must have been very good for her, helping her suppress her southern vagaries and try to be accurate and honest. Glad she married him, even though it was brief.   Willa   [Stout #1142]

To Zoë AkinsDec. 31, 1932Huntington 

Beautiful potted apple tree arrived Christmas Eve and is still blooming. The wonderful Josephine is back! Still a wonderful cook. Has decided many of the details in Shadows on the Rock came from Josephine. Wishes Zoë were beginning the new year with Hugo, but remember, our personal lives aren't measured by time.   Willa   [Stout #1146]

To Zoë AkinsFeb. 19, [1933]Huntington 

Many thanks for the pictures of her home and of herself and of Hugo. Many people in town now, no chance of working. Regrets the news about Sara Teasdale. Why didn't she find anything to live for? Off to a concert with the Menuhins!   Willa   [Stout #1163]

To Professor HornbergerMay 1946 "DRAFT" is written across the top and the letter is unsigned; ; UNL-Rosowski Cather 

Will never allow Death Comes for the Archbishop to be in an anthology, as anthologies are ultimately shallow [Horberger published The Literature of the United States in 1946]. After speaking to many young people, is convinced that the college classroom is no place for modern books. When a man is in school, he ought to study the classics of the English canon. An energetic undergraduate will read current books for fun. When teaching school in Pittsburgh, was forced to use a set list of texts, which included Silas Marner, Rime of the Ancient Mariner, Marmion, Quentin Durward, Benjamin Franklin's Autobiography, Macbeth, and the poetry of Robert Burns. Some students are still in contact. Would Prof. Hornberger consider Silas Marner—a rewarding if unhurried book, good for modern students—worthy of an anthology? Does not know who selected the list and was given no options, but was expected to read them and test the students on them. This is the limit of what a high school English class can be. If one hundred students read a great writer, about two of them will be affected deeply, and the other ninety-eight will not be injured by it. When reading the classics, there needs to be no distasteful argument of a writer's worth. All anthologies make this kind of argument, except for Field-Marshal Wavell's [ Other Men's Flowers: An Anthology of Poetry ], whose notes are sometimes better than even the selected work. Except for the glut of Browning's work, his selections are perfect. He loves The Hound of Heaven and expresses that. He fears neither Rommel nor erudition. PS: Please send a list of pieces in Volume One to aid in thinking about Volume Two.

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