A Calendar of the Letters of Willa Cather

93 letters found

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Results 11-20:

To Jessie B. Rittenhouse,  Tuesday, [1913?] Newberry 

Has made several changes in the poem [ "Grandmither, Think Not I Forget" ].[Reprinted in The Little Book of Modern Verse, 1913, ed. Rittenhouse.]   Willa Sibert Cather   [Stout #253]

To Elizabeth Shepley Sergeant,  Sunday [pm. Sept. 28, 1914] , from PittsburghPM 

Back from an active summer. Brought along her twenty-year-old brother, who is enrolled at Carnegie Technical. Couldn't put the war out of her mind even when she was in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains [in northern New Mexico]. Shouldn't hear any more about suffrage and such for a while. Recent issues of Punch make one realize how solid England is. Kipling's recent speech was splendid. Will be in New York in October but only for a week; wants to keep working on her book in Pittsburgh until the first of the year.   Willa   [Stout #287]

To Mrs. George P. Cather [Aunt Franc]Nov. 17, [1914], from PittsburghUNL-Ray  copy at WCPM

Has been working well. Expects to be in Pittsburgh until Christmas. Jack doing well at school; sees him often. War occupies all conversation. A friend from Belgium, Mme Flahant, is in New York and says her family members in Brussels are starving. The Belgian Relief Committee in London says that only the U.S. can sustain Belgium through the winter. Germans allow no food in that comes through England or France. Will donate to the relief fund instead of sending Christmas presents. America will have to answer to history if it fails Belgium.   Willie   [Stout #289]

To Ferris GreensletApr. 22, [1915]Harvard 

Is enclosing two postcards of Breton's The Song of the Lark; prefers the one in brown tones. How does he like the later chapters of the book? Can't revise until she gets a short story done for McClure's and gets her brother sent back to Pittsburgh.   W. S. C.   [Stout #299]

To Elizabeth Shepley SergeantJune 27, [1915], from New YorkPM 

Has just read her essay on Provence in Century. Is busy with proofs. Jack is off in Maine. A musical critic is reading galleys and is enthusiastic, especially about the singing lessons. Would have felt bad if those hadn't been right! Has she seen Henry James's article about Mrs. Fields in the June Atlantic? Isn't she disappointed in Owen Wister's novel? [Pentecost of Calamity, 1915] P.S.: Loves her khaki outfit for the cliff dwellings— reminds her of Kurt's outfit in Fidelio [ Beethoven ].  Willa   [Stout #310]

To Mrs. George P. Cather [Aunt Franc]Dec. 25, 1915, from PittsburghUNL-Ray 

Is sending her love on this special day. Since Isabelle McClung has lost her father as well as her mother and this house (which has been almost a home to her [Cather] for fifteen years) is to be sold, it is her last Christmas there. May never feel so secure in any other house. Even her apartment in New York, pleasant as it is, is not a home in the way this was. Has been spending some time with Jack during the school vacation. New book enjoying good sales as well as favorable reviews. Is eager to get to work on a new one.   Willa    [Stout #343]

To Mrs. George P. Cather [Aunt Franc],  Saturday [pm. July 14, 1917] , from Red Cloud, Nebr.UNL-Ray 

Father so enjoyed listening to Will Andrews's new Victrola that they stayed too late to get by Bladen before going home. It was almost dark when they got back to Red Cloud. Will come to visit next week, before Jack has to leave.   Willie   [Stout #389]

To Mrs. George P. Cather [Aunt Franc]Sept. 9, [pm. 1917], from the Shattuck Inn, Jaffrey, N.H.UNL-Ray 

Understands her regret that G. P. has enlisted, but he has always wanted to be in the military and this is his chance. It's a time of return to basics: men carrying guns. For herself, feels proud of him and glad he can go, especially as an officer. Wishes Jack were going. Was sorry not to see her, but the heat was debilitating and she and her friend fled back East. Was too worn out to work for a while, but now is working every morning in a tent about a mile from the inn. Douglass's reports about Mother are disheartening. Wonders if she should go to California to see about her. Address is at Hotel Garfield on O'Farrell Street in San Francisco. Elsie is delighted with her school and with Albuquerque. On the whole, families are pretty good things to have.   Willa   [Stout #390]

To Charles F. Cather [father]July 7, [1920], from ParisUNL-Ray 

Has found out the location of Grosvenor's grave. Please let Aunt Franc know. It is registered by the Society for the Care of the American Dead. He is buried in Grave No. 2, Plot B, in the American Cemetery at Villiers Tournelle. From all reports of how the dead at Cantigny were handled, there can be no uncertainty that it is G. P. Will go there next week and take a picture. Isabelle and Jan will go along. Will stay overnight in a home, as there are no hotels. Feeling a little homesick and eager to return to her own country and her own people, although this country and people are wonderful.   Willie   [Stout #511]

To Mary Miner CreightonFeb. 4, [1922]Newberry 

Enclosing a letter from Mrs. Floyd Dell that will amuse her with its revelation of the maternal impulses of even a habituée of Greenwich Village.   Willie   [Stout #575]

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