A Calendar of the Letters of Willa Cather

6 letters found

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To Ferris GreensletMay 2, [1919], from New YorkHarvard 

Glad Heinemann will publish an edition. Getting inquiries about serial rights on next novel, to be titled simply "Claude." Won't decide until they talk. Has sold two stories for good prices and two articles for Red Cross Magazine. P.S.: What do Londoners think of Wilson?  Willa Cather   [Stout #456]

To Mrs. George P. Cather [Aunt Franc]July 4, [1920], from ParisUNL-Ray 

A huge procession of war orphans marched in a parade today to celebrate America. The stars and stripes flying above public buildings. The French like American soldiers, but not Wilson. Hopes to go to Cantigny next week, though trains still disrupted. Feeling good after the voyage. Almost dreads trip to Naples, with travel so difficult now.   Willa   [Stout #510]

To Mr. Carroll,  Ash Wednesday [Feb. 9, 1921] Wellesley 

Please be her valentine and come to tea on Monday the 14th at four.   Willa Cather   [Stout #530]

To James Southall WilsonMar. 3, 1931UVa 

Is leaving soon for California, where her mother is an invalid. Cannot serve on organizing committee on southern writers. Use of her name in such a way would bring other demands on her time.   Willa Cather   [Stout #1040]

To Bernard DeVotoMar. 10, 1937Stanford 

Appreciated his published letter to Edmund Wilson. Has wanted to say something along those lines herself—that economic conditions are a very small part of human life. Theorists the only ones interested in theories. Social crusaders seem to lose sight of individual human beings. Leo Tolstoi decided, in the end, that it was a mistake to try to reform society. Glad he stepped up to say the world is made up of persons, not masses, and that history, not theories, is our best guide to understanding humanity.   Willa Cather   [Stout #1357]

To Carroll WilsonMarch 18, 1926Drew U (Adams 168.1) 

In response to his inquiry, insists that Georgine Milmine is a very real person and did a good deal of work collecting information for the history [The Life of Mary Baker G. Eddy, first published in McClure's January 1907 through June 1908; published in book form as The Life of Mary Baker G. Eddy and the History of Christian Science by Georgine Milmine, New York: Doubleday, Page, & Co., 1909]. Milmine did not really write it, but four or five people, including herself, worked on it in the editorial room of McClure's. Does not wish to be identified with the book, for was never interested in it except editorially and shared the work with others. Mr. Smith was not there at the time, if memory serves, so he must have heard his stories from somebody else. Please keep this information quiet. Wilson's profession assures his prudence, one would think.   Willa Cather