A Calendar of the Letters of Willa Cather

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Results 11-20:

To Will Owen JonesMay 7, 1903 from 1180 Murray Hill PittsburghUVa 

Thanks for launching her with S. S. McClure. Had a telegram from him and has been to New York to see him. Feeling elated, as if her life is now more valuable than before. McClure to run her stories in the magazine, then publish as a book. Will place for her any he does not use. At the McClure house met wife of Robert Louis Stevenson, who had read the stories. Greatly appreciates his help. Other plans afoot. P.S.: Doesn't seem to be able to reach Sarah Harris.  Willa S. Cather   [Stout #84]

To Dr. James Hulme CanfieldMay 21, 1903 from PittsburghUVt 

Appreciates his bringing her book to people's attention. Enjoyed visiting with Mrs. Canfield and Dorothy in New York.   Willa S. Cather   [Stout #86]

To Viola Roseboro'June 14,[1903], from 1180 Murray Hill, PittsburghHarvard 

Typed note by Witter Bynner indicates that Roseboro' gave him the letters. Yes, certainly knows A Shropshire Lad. Don't her own poems show it? Traced Housman in Shropshire, where he seems unknown. Visited him in a boardinghouse in a dreary London suburb. He looked gaunt, seemed bitter, but is the only English poet now active whose work will endure. Though an instructor in Latin, he writes strictly from the level of a country boy.   Willa S. Cather   [Stout #88]

To Viola Roseboro'n.d., from 1180 Murray Hill Avenue, Pittsburgh incomplete; bears a headnote by Witter BynnerHarvard 

Hard to believe he [ Housman ] refused the money. What nobility! Still remembers, from when she paid that call along with two American friends, the holes in his shoes and in the carpet, couch with broken springs, his uneasiness. Manner stern and patrician. They all cried on the way back.   [Stout #89]

To Dorothy Canfield,  n.d. [c. Jan. 5, 1905] UVt 

Can't withdraw the story without canceling the entire volume, which is already in type. Doubts Miss Osborne will ever see it, let alone take it to heart. Does not agree it is a portrait of her. Isabelle, who has a strong moral sense, does not see anything wrong. This has spoiled the pleasure in her first book of fiction. Wouldn't ask such a thing of anyone. Is very hurt by Dorothy's attitude.   Willa   [Stout #101]

To Witter BynnerJune 7, 1905Harvard 

Writes about life in the West out of personal experience. Realizes stories are rather grim. Some details in "A Wagner Matinee" remembered from Cather ranch. Recalls how she and her brothers loved the few trees that grew along a nearby creek, the bleakness of the first Christmas, the drought during early college years, when there were suicides among their neighbors. Things are better there now.   Willa Sibert Cather   [Stout #105]

To unidentified recipient [prob. Witter Bynner first part of letter missing],  n.d. [c. Jan. 15, 1906] Harvard 

Agrees the story is rather chilly and impersonal, but it doesn't warrant amplification. Looks forward to visit so they can talk. Will try again on The Golden Bowl [James, 1904]. Didn't manage to penetrate it last year. Wonders what new Kipling story is about.    Willa Sibert Cather   [Stout #109]

To Witter BynnerFeb. 24, [1906 ?]Harvard 

Has revised the story but done nothing with the novel. Appreciates his calling her book to [Henry?] James's attention; very pleased with James's letter. Would be disappointed if he and a couple of others did not think the way he says. Feels nervous at the thought of his considering her writing further.   Willa Sibert Cather   [Stout #110]

To H. G. Dwight,  Saturday [June 23, 1906] on McClure's letterhead ; Amherst 

Sorry to have missed him. Felt ill and left early. Can they have an appointment July 2 or 3?   Willa S. Cather   [Stout #113]

To H. G. DwightJuly 3, 1906 on McClure's letterhead ; Amherst 

Will publish "The Valley of the Mills" as is if he can't revise it. Would like to see "Mortmain" again if he can sharpen its point.   S. S. McClure, per W. S. C.   [Stout #114]

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