A Calendar of the Letters of Willa Cather

566 letters found

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Results 11-20:

To Will Owen Jones,  Tuesday [Sept. 7, 1897] from Red Cloud, Nebr.WCPM 

Has just that day been hired by the Pittsburgh Leader at $75 a month. To report next week. Has been writing stories, but must take this opportunity. Socializes too much in Pittsburgh, but can't resist [Emma] Calvé and [Sarah] Bernhardt.   [Stout #42]

To Mariel GereWednesday [pm. Sept. 8, 1897] from Red Cloud, Nebr.WCPM 

Has been called back to Pittsburgh by the Leader. Will be in Lincoln Friday to Tuesday.    Willa   [Stout #43]

To Mariel GereJan. 10, 1897 [actually 1898] from PittsburghWCPM 

Roscoe has been ill, but needs money worse than he needs her presence. How nice it is to have independence! Life has a lot of variety these days. Mr. Farrar broke his leg but is still capable of fun. Mrs. Canfield and Dorothy visited during Christmas. Turned the tables by introducing them to society. Many parties, including a dinner for Ethelbert Nevin. Has met interesting people—Anthony Hope Hopkins, F. Marion Crawford, Fridtjof Nansen. Went shopping with Nevin today, and he bought her a bunch of violets.    Willa   [Stout #47]

To Mariel Gere,  n.d. [Dec. 7, 1898] , excerpt transcribed by Bernice Slote ; UNL 

Dorothy Canfield is the "Real Thing." [allusion to story by Henry James.]   [Stout #54]

To [?] ,  n.d. [prob. 1897 or 1898] excerpt transcribed by Bernice Slote ; UNL 

Enjoyed Thanksgiving visit to Columbus. Canfields away, leaving house to Dorothy, Jim and fiancée, and herself. Many parties. Is spending much of her leisure time with Ethelbert Nevin, a lovable man. Has been reading Kipling's poetry, as she used to at the university.   [Stout #55]

To Mariel GereAug. 2, 1899WCPM 

How lucky Mariel is! [See #0053.] Is traveling home the long way, by the Great Lakes, but will be in Lincoln the next Sunday. Is worried about her mother, who has been ill.   Willa   [Stout #57]

To Dorothy CanfieldOct. 10, 1899 from 1176 Murray Hill, PittsburghUVt 

Is studying Greek and being treated like a goddess. Hasn't seen the Nevins, but they have phoned and he has sent a copy of Shakespeare's sonnets. In Chicago had dinner with Mr. Dooley. He and the Peatties encouraged her to come there to work. Mrs. Peattie's new story in Atlantic ["The Man at the Edge of Things," reviewed by Cather Nov. 4] establishes her as a writer. Was met at the train station by Isabelle, looking beautiful. They have been walking in the hills and going to concerts. Has read all of Dorothy's letters from Paris. Had a nice visit with May Willard last night. P.S.: Will tell her about Alfred next time.  Willa   [Stout #58]

To Will Owen JonesMay 7, 1903 from 1180 Murray Hill PittsburghUVa 

Thanks for launching her with S. S. McClure. Had a telegram from him and has been to New York to see him. Feeling elated, as if her life is now more valuable than before. McClure to run her stories in the magazine, then publish as a book. Will place for her any he does not use. At the McClure house met wife of Robert Louis Stevenson, who had read the stories. Greatly appreciates his help. Other plans afoot. P.S.: Doesn't seem to be able to reach Sarah Harris.  Willa S. Cather   [Stout #84]

To Dorothy Canfield,  n.d. [c. May 15–20, 1903] UVt 

As a result of Dorothy's having written to her [Cather's] mother, has had the first letter from her that she could bear to read in two years. They may yet make peace. Isabelle and Edith away on a fishing trip to West Virginia. Sarah Harris has written denouncing the "animalism" of April Twilights—must be crazy. Is tired from parties and work. Is Mrs. Canfield painting? Has she read "The Better Sort" [volume of short stories by Henry James, pub. 1903]? Very complex and obscure.    Willie   [Stout #85]

To Viola Roseboro'June 14,[1903], from 1180 Murray Hill, PittsburghHarvard 

Typed note by Witter Bynner indicates that Roseboro' gave him the letters. Yes, certainly knows A Shropshire Lad. Don't her own poems show it? Traced Housman in Shropshire, where he seems unknown. Visited him in a boardinghouse in a dreary London suburb. He looked gaunt, seemed bitter, but is the only English poet now active whose work will endure. Though an instructor in Latin, he writes strictly from the level of a country boy.   Willa S. Cather   [Stout #88]

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