#0069: Willa Cather to Mariel Clapham Gere, [July 14, 1901]

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My Dear Mrs. Gere1;

I arrived home3 after a tedious but fairly comfortable journey. The Hastings4 route is bad enough but infinitely better than the Wymore5 one. I found the children6 less changed than I had feared and mother7 better than Doctor Lowery8 had led me to hope. The intense heat has worn everyone out and I am not over confident about working under such disadvantageous circumstances. Mrs. Garber9 is well, I learn, but no one ever sees her any more as she goes nowhere. Fred10 was to have been married11 this month, but the event has been delayed, as usual.

I hope Mariel12 is feeling better by this time. I feel almost ashamed to grumble at the weather when she looks so thin and worn. When I see you in August I hope to feel more like myself, for at present I am just about half here, having lost the rest of me somewhere along the road. I saw just enough of you all to make me dissatisfied until I have seen more. May the Hay fever give you a long vacation and the hot winds deal gently with you.

With all my love to you Willa