#1468: Willa Cather to Carrie Miner Sherwood, January 29 [1940]

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⬩W⬩S⬩C⬩ My dear Carrie1;

Doctor Lewis3 wrote me such a kind and such a satisfactory letter. I showed it to a surgeon at the New York Orthopedic Hospital and he said he could not have written a better letter himself. He was able to understand Mollie's4 injury perfectly from the letter, and agreed with Doctor Lewis in his treatment and all his conclusions. Please tell that to Mollie. I will write the doctor myself just as soon as I have a free moment.

I am enclosing a check to be used in toward the payment of Mollie’s nurse. Please drop me a line and tell me what the nurse’s charge is per week. I want to keep up the nurse’s wages if I can, for that will be the largest regular expense.

It has been very cold here2, too, and I was kept in the house5 with bronchitis for four weeks. I look in the Times6 every morning for the weather report in Omaha7, and from that I can pretty well guess what the weather is likely to be with you. I thank both you and Mary8 for your dear letters—Mary’s came while I was still in bed. Until they left for California9, January 17th, Yehudi10 and Nola11 came to see me almost every day—they are never afraid of “catching” anything. Yehudi kept the wood fire going, and Nola made the tea. How much good happy young people can give one, just by their happiness and their affection.

Soon, dear Carrie, I hope to write you a long letter. It’s such a pleasure to me to write to the peop people I love.

Lovingly always Willie