A Calendar of the Letters of Willa Cather

46 letters found

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To Mrs. Helen StowellMay 31, 1889 from Red Cloud, Nebr.WCPM 

Won Latin prize at end of school year. Grades of 90 in rhetoric, 95 in Latin, and 100s in physics, astronomy, and ancient history. Teacher wrote a message in report card praising her literary interests. Has fixed up a room at father's office as a library. Is reading the Latin Bible, astronomy, geology, history, Homer, Milton, Swinburne, Ouida, and George Sand. Sister Jessie in school musicale yesterday. Mother, Mrs. Wiener, Mrs. Garber, and husbands [Charles F. Cather, Charles F. Wiener, and Silas Garber] had a picnic. Longs to go to Europe. Mary Miner doing well at piano. P.S.: As usual, Cather house is a gathering place for young people to flirt.  William Cather, Jr.   [Stout #2]

To Mariel GereJune 1, 1893 from Red Cloud, Nebr. on father's letterhead ; WCPM 

Had to leave without saying goodbye because of grandmother's illness. Brother James has the measles. Sister Elsie prates of Willie and "Willwese" [for Louise]. Louise dislikes the name Willa but will not call her Love in front of others. Could Mariel and her sisters come to visit? Louise may do so. Mrs. Wiener's health has improved, and Mrs. Garber is her pleasant self.   W. Cather   [Stout #12]

To Mariel GereJune 16, 1894 from Red Cloud, Nebr.WCPM 

Children were all dressed up for her homecoming. Is reading Virgil and botanizing. Mr. Wiener now boarding at Mrs. Garber's. Thanks for being mainstay during past winter and spring, when she [Cather] was despairing over the loss of what she had lived for. Appreciates her patience these past years while she raved over a certain girl's beauty, charm, and talent; rhapsodized over merely touching that person's hand; and suffered through the loss of love. Loving too much is a mistake. Hopes they can meet in Crete [Nebr.] Douglass may come, too.   Willa   [Stout #17]

To Will Owen JonesMay 7, 1903 from 1180 Murray Hill PittsburghUVa 

Thanks for launching her with S. S. McClure. Had a telegram from him and has been to New York to see him. Feeling elated, as if her life is now more valuable than before. McClure to run her stories in the magazine, then publish as a book. Will place for her any he does not use. At the McClure house met wife of Robert Louis Stevenson, who had read the stories. Greatly appreciates his help. Other plans afoot. P.S.: Doesn't seem to be able to reach Sarah Harris.  Willa S. Cather   [Stout #84]

To Mrs. George P. Cather [Aunt Franc]Feb. 22, 1911UNL-Ray 

Another busy winter. Elsie made her first visit to New York at Christmas; they had a wonderful time except for worrying about Mother, who'd hurt herself in a fall. Elsie liked the apartment and the colored maid, who has taken over all housekeeping cares. Health is better this winter, though working all summer while Mr. McClure was ill in Europe wore her down. Had some time away to recuperate in the fall. Saw Mr. Wiener a few weeks ago; he is still himself, in spite of having made so much money. Isabelle visiting and sends her greeting. Hears from Howard Gore that he is going to the coronation of the king of Siam, whom he knew years ago. Wishes he wouldn't pursue aristocrats, but vanity seems endemic to Washington. Hears that Bessie and Auntie are well, and that she and Uncle George are too. May have to go to England in April. Hopes to receive a letter from her before going.   Willie   [Stout #188]

To Fanny ButcherFeb. 16, [1912?]Newberry 

So glad to get Fanny's letter and to hear she is opening a book shop. Would be pleased to have her [Cather's] picture displayed in it. Going abroad in late spring, but must go see parents first. Knows handwriting is hard to read, but wanted to send a personal message. P.S.: Will come by to see the shop if possible.  Willa Cather   [Stout #212]

To Carrie Miner SherwoodMar. 13, 1919 [actually 1918], from New YorkWCPM 

So glad to have her letter. Theirs is a lifelong friendship. Proud to hear of her work for the Red Cross. Has had a hard winter, with fuel shortage and illnesses, and the book will be delayed. Olive Fremstad helped get her through an attack of bronchitis; she wasn't working because there were no German operas this year. Is getting along well with Isabelle's husband now, having learned to like him. Was at the Wieners' house often before Mr. Wiener's death. A gracious family, unlike many wealthy Jews. Edith sends regards. Winter was hard on her, too, but of course worst on the poor people of the city.   Willie   [Stout #414]

To Fannie ButcherFeb. 16, 1920, from no. 5 Bank Street, New York, dedication written on photograph ; Butcher 

"For Fannie Butcher, who wrote the first discriminating review of my first novel. (In this case my interest in the reviewer has outlasted my interest in the novel, for I don't think much of that book now!) With greetings and good wishes,    Willa Sibert Cather   [Stout #497]

To Irene Miner WeiszMar. 4, [1920], from New YorkNewberry 

Please encourage people to patronize Fanny Butcher's shop.   Willie   [Stout #500]

To Fanny ButcherMar. 19, [1920], from New YorkNewberry 

Trying to get a passport. Will be abroad when Youth and the Bright Medusa comes out this fall. Hopes she will like it.   Willa Cather   [Stout #502]