#0452: Willa Cather to Carrie Miner Sherwood, February 11 [1919]

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Dear Carrie1:

I am sending you today a bunch of the most important notices of our book4. You need not return them to me, but you must let Irene5 see them. The one6 in the “Dial”7 is the one I like best, because it was written by the most intelligent man8. He died a few weeks after this article was printed, of influenza, and his death is a great loss to American letters. I enclose a notice about him along with the reviews. I have had more than a hundred letters about the book, from all sorts of people, and answering them has really been a serious drain on my time. Mr. Edwin W. Winter9, for many years president of the Missouri Pacific railroad, after writing me two letters, came to see see me to tell me how much he liked the book, and now he often drops in on Friday and seems like an old friend. From first to last this book has been a great pleasure and satisfaction to me, but nothing pleases me quite so much as that you and father10 like it so well.

Affectionately Willie

Did you get a copy of Durer’s11 rabbit picture12 I sent you some weeks ago? at Christmas time?