#2420: Willa Cather to Mary Virginia Boak Cather, [about June 2, 1920]

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Address c/o Thomas Cook & Son, 1 Place de l'Opera Dearest Mother1:

we have safely arrived in Paris2. When we got here Edith3 was very sick after two weeks of sea-sickness, and we drove about hunting rooms, found everything crowded, and had to go to a very grand and expensive hotel for two days until she got better. Yesterday we moved to a small old-fashioned hotel, where we pay only $3 three dollars a day and are fairly comfortable. That would have been very dear for a small hotel in Paris before the war, but everything has doubled or trebled in price. We find the French people kind and cordial, though of course they distrust Americans because after making such friendly protestations, we behaved so badly4 about the Peace Treaty.

I never felt better than I did at sea, but I am always let down for a few days after I land. It is rather hard to travel with anyone as frail and sick as Edith, though she is so patient and asks so little. If only she gets well over here, we will have a beautiful stay in Paris.

With much love, Willa