Skip to main content

#0040: Willa Cather to Helen Hiller Seibel, July 23, 1897

More about this letter…
Plain view:

Guide to Reading Letter Transcriptions

Some of these features are only visible when "plain text" is off.

Textual Feature Appearance
passage deleted with a strikethrough mark deleted passage
passage deleted by overwritten added letters overwritten passage
passage added above the line passage with added text above
passage added on the line passage with added text inline
passage added in the margin passage with text added in margin
handwritten addition to a typewritten letter typed passage with added handwritten text
missing or unreadable text missing text noted with "[illegible]"
uncertain transcriptions word[?]
notes written by someone other than Willa Cather Note in another's hand
printed letterhead text printed text
text printed on postcards, envelopes, etc. printed text
text of date and place stamps stamped text
My Dear Mrs. Seibel1;

As it is probable that I will not return to Pittsburgh3 before September4 I will just drop you a line to let you know that I am still in the land of the living. The Home Monthly5 has sold out6 and I have severed my connection7 with it, but I now expect to return to Pittsburgh this fall and try to get into general newspaper work8. I don't know just what chance there may be there for that sort of thing and if Mr. Seibel9 can give me any advice or information along that line I will appreciate it.

Has Mr. Axtell10 settled11 with Mr. Seibel yet? If not tell him to go up and present his bill in person and insist on payment. And the sooner he does it the better. Axtell is too good a Christian to be trusted. I have several times given him an itemized statement of Mr. Seibel's account.

It is fine to be at home again I can tell you. Jack12 has stamped brownies13 over everything I possess. He had grown so I scarcely knew him. My older brother14 and I are going on a little hunting trip15 out in the sage brush country of Colorado16 next week month. That is a land of big yellow moons, magnificent distances, Spanish herd boys and deserters from the English army, so we anticipate a "Kiplingy17" time of it.

I picked up a little spoon for Erna18 down town the other day. There is not much to select from in this wild village where silver mounted six shooters form the principal articles of the jewelers trade. But such as it is I send it to her with many kisses,—and much love to you all. Drop me a note to let me know how the world goes with you.

Faithfully Willa Cather.

P.S. I have been reading Charles Lamb19's "Dramatic Essays"20. Pick them p up some time, I think they are the best articles on the stage ever done in English.

Mrs. George Seibel1 114 S. 11th St.[?] [illegible] Pittsburgh3 Pa.